Plants – Useful Plants Guide – Cosmetics



Plants / Invader Plants Guide / Plants that are Toxic to Animals / Regional Plants Guide / Useful Plants Guide / Annuals / Bulbs / Climbers / Conifers / Ferns / Ground Covers / Hedges / Kitchen Garden Plants / Lawns / Mushrooms / Orchids / Perennials / Potplants / Rock Garden Plants / Shrubs / Trees / Water Garden Plants

Useful Plants Guide
Useful Plants Guide - Herbal Recipes
Useful Plants Guide - Cosmetics
Useful Plants Guide - Aromatherapy
Useful Plants Guide - Medicinal
Useful Plants Guide - Medicinal Herbs
Useful Plants Guide - Medicinal Plants
Useful Plants Guide - De-pollutants

Dry Skin Borage, Comfrey, Chamomile, Horseradish.
Ageing Skin Comfrey, Fennel, Parsley, Savory, French Sorrel, Thyme.
Acne Borage, Caraway, Chervil, Cress, Garlic, Lavender, Lovage, Salad Burnet, Savory, Sorrel.
Eczema Horseradish.
Enlarged Pores Basil, Parsley, Sage.
Brittle Nails Chives, Dill.
Healthier Hair Cress, Rosemary, Sage.

Herbal Cosmetic Recipes:

Facial Steam for Normal Skin-types:
Take equal quantities of Bay leaves, Chamomile flowers, Rosemary- and Rose petals and add to near boiling water.

Moisturising mask of Feverfew:
Place 2 parts milk to 1 part of fresh feverfew leaves in a saucepan and simmer for half an hour. Let cool and filter the liquid into a clean bottle. Keep refrigerated. Apply to clean skin, let it dry and rinse off with tepid water.

Face Mask of Fennel:
Mix together 1 ½ tablespoons strong infusion of fennel seed, ¼ cup plain yoghurt and 4 tablespoons honey. Spread liberally over face and neck, leave for 20 minutes and wash off with lukewarm water.

Face Mask of Chamomile (for dry skin):
Pour 2 cups of boiling water over 6 tablespoons of fresh chamomile flowers (or 2 table spoons of dried flowers). While leaving it to stand for 45 minutes, warm 1 tablespoon of honey in a saucepan over low heat. Mix in 4 tablespoons of oats and add about ¾ cup of the strained chamomile infusion too. Apply and leave on face for 10 minutes and wash off with tepid water. Use on your face when needed, otherwise keep refrigerated.

Gentle face cleanser of Fennel:
Use this natural product for gentle cleansing and remember to keep it in the fridge! To make the cleanser you will need… 3 cups of boiling water poured over 3 tablespoons of crushed fennel seeds. Stand for an hour. Mix 6 tablespoons of buttermilk and 1 ½ tablespoon of honey and add this to the fennel seed infusion after the required standing time. Pour the mixture in a clean bottle and keep refrigerated.

Refreshing Toner of Horseradish:
Make an infusion of Horseradish and milk by gently heating 1 cup of milk to just under boiling point and adding the sliced root. Let cool and pat the milk on skin.

Toner of Tansy:
Add 2 cups each of water, milk and fresh tansy leaves together and place in a saucepan. After bringing it to the boil, simmer for 15 minutes and let cool. Filter the liquid into a clean bottle and refrigerate.

Deodorizing Bath of Lovage:
Take 2 handfuls of fresh Lovage leaves, bruise them and add to hot bath water.

Hair rinse:
Boil together 10 cups of water with 2 cups of sage leaves, chamomile flowers or rosemary tips. Simmer for 25 minutes and then leave to cool. Filter after 2 hours and pour into a clean bottle.
Sage - disguise grey hair (note that sage may stain towels!);
Chamomile - adding life to fair hair;
Rosemary - adding shine to hair.

Bath Oil:

Agathosma betulina (Buchu)
The broad leaves of this 2m high plant have conspicuous oil glands and the small, star-shaped flowers are white or pale purple. Distribution is restricted to the mountains of the Western Cape. The dried leaves have many medicinal uses due to its antiseptic and diuretic properties. Lobostemon fruticosus (Agdaegeneesbossie) This small, multi-branched shrub is about 1m high with silvery-green, hairy leaves and trumpet-shaped flowers vary in colour of blue- and pink shades. It is distributed in the fynbos regions of South Africa. Fresh foliage and twigs are used to treat internal problems and to purify the blood. It has wound-healing properties and treats skin diseases.

Pelargonium cucullatum (Wild geranium)
The circular leaves of the more or less 1m high Pelargonium is serrated and rich green. It is spring and summer flowering with clusters of mainly pink or white blooms. Distribution is mainly through the Western Cape and the Karoo. Plant parts are used for treating coughs and chest trouble.

Herbal Bath Bag:

Hypericum perforatum (St John’s wort)
This 1m high perennial has creeping rhizomes and upright branches with yellow flowers, followed by small seed pods. The opposite leaves are covered with translucent oil glands. This shrub is widely distributed in the Western Cape. Medicinal uses include treatment for depression, insomnia, gout, rheumatism and diarrhoea, to mention a few.

Valerian capensis (Cape valerian)
These perennial herbs have numerous long and thin rhizomes from which erect, hollow stems develop. Unequally divided leaves consist of a large, top leaflet and smaller leaflets lower down. Clusters of inconspicuous white, pink, lilac or mauve flowers are clustered on the branch ends. Distributed widely in South Africa and into tropical Africa. The roots and rhizomes are used for their calming properties and for treating asthma, bronchitis, insomnia, and hysteria plus heart trouble.

Eriocephalus africanus (Wild rosemary)
A small, 1m high shrub with small, silvery and hairy foliage clustered on the many branches. Tufts of seed hairs follow flower heads of pale purple. Distribution is mainly in the Eastern- and Western Cape and Namaqualand. The foliage and twigs are used as diaphoretic and diuretics for treating heart disease and stomach aches.

Foeniculum vulgare (Fennel)
These 1,5m high perennial herbs are erect and have sheaths of leaf stalks around its thick stems. The foliage is needle-shaped and feathery, the umbels of flowers yellow and small. Small, brownish fruits are divided into two segments. It is widely distributed in South Africa and the dried fruits have many medicinal uses. Fennel seeds are used for chronic coughs, as a diuretic, indigestion and for flatulence.

Tie these little bags under the tap before running your bath. They need fresh refills with every bath, which enables you to decide what you need from and for your little bag on the given night.

To make the bath bag you will need…
One rectangular piece of fabric, 16cm x 5cm.
Piece of ribbon.
Mix ½ cup of oatmeal and ½ cup of selected herbs.
Thread and needle.
Fold the fabric length in half, right sides facing each other, so that the length comes to 8cm. Iron the folded end flat. Stitch the long sides closed so that you end up with a bag. Fill with herb/oats mixture and tie the open side closed with ribbon.

Peace Pillows:

Tecomaria capensis (Cape honeysuckle)
An evergreen shrub of 3m high that rambles with fern-like foliage and orange trumpet-shaped flowers that appear most of the year. It is distributed mainly in the Eastern Cape, the Transvaal lowveld and Natal coast.

Eriocephalus africanus (Wild rosemary)
A small, 1m high shrub with small, silvery and hairy foliage clustered on the many branches. Tufts of seed hairs follow flower heads of pale purple. Distribution is mainly in the Eastern- and Western Cape and Namaqualand. The foliage and twigs are used as diaphoretic and diuretics for treating heart disease and stomach aches.

Mentha longifolia (Wild mint)
This highly aromatic perennial herb has creeping rhizomes and small white or pale purple flower clusters on the stem tips of almost 1m high. Opposite leaves are square in cross-section. The distribution is wide in South Africa, mainly in moist areas of good rainfall. Leaves, stems and rhizomes are used for respiratory ailments like coughs, colds and asthma, to treat headaches, fevers, flatulence, indigestion, hysteria and more.

Many different herbs can be used, but make sure to use types with soothing and sleep-educing properties like Lavender. A combination of herbs can be used together or you can stick to one. These pillows are used to sleep better and for calming nerves. They make great gifts.
To make the pillow you will need…
One rectangular piece of fabric, 84cm x 32cm.
Herbs of choice.
Piece of dried citrus peel (this will help to retain the fragrance of the herbs for longer).
Thread and needle.
Fold the fabric length in half, right sides facing each other, so that the length comes to 42cm. Iron the folded end flat. Stitch the long sides closed so that you end up with a bag. Fill with herb mixture and peel, and stitch remaining side closed.

Soaps:

Agathosma betulina (Buchu)
The broad leaves of this 2m high plant have conspicuous oil glands and the small, star-shaped flowers are white or pale purple. Distribution is restricted to the mountains of the Western Cape. The dried leaves have many medicinal uses due to its antiseptic and diuretic properties.

Pelargonium cucullatum (Wild geranium)
The circular leaves of the more or less 1m high Pelargonium is serrated and rich green. It is spring and summer flowering with clusters of mainly pink or white blooms. Distribution is mainly through the Western Cape and the Karoo. Plant parts are used for treating coughs and chest trouble.

Cyclopia intermedia (Honeybush tea)
The multi-branched, woody shrub of 1m high has golden coloured young twigs clothed in leaves, comprising of three leaflets. Flat, brown seed pods appear after the flowering period of yellow blooms. It is distributed in the southern and eastern parts of the Cape. Leaves, twigs and flowers are used in liquid form to treat weak digestion amongst others.

Bulbine frutescens (Balsemkopiva, Ibhucu)
Rosettes of fleshy, lime-green foliage are formed from which long, thin flowering stems emerge with clusters of yellow blooms. This plant is widely distributed in South Africa and its fresh foliage and roots are used for skin irritations, wounds, burns, rheumatism and many more.

Carpobrotus edulis (Sour fig)
The smooth fleshy leaves of this succulent creeper are triangular in cross-section and erect of reddish-green colouring. Large and fleshy flowers are yellow and develop into fragrant, fleshy fruit. The sour fig is distributed widely in South Africa. The juice and pulp of the foliage is used for treating infections, skin irritations, burns, wounds and many more.

Candles:

Protea repens (Suikerbos, Sugarbush)
This erect shrub of up to 3m high has smooth, narrow leaves and flowers of pink, red or cream. It is widely distributed in the Western Cape where it forms large, dense stands. Syrup of the nectar is made and used for relieving and suppressing coughs.

Agathosma betulina (Buchu)
The broad leaves of this 2m high plant have conspicuous oil glands and the small, star-shaped flowers are white or pale purple. Distribution is restricted to the mountains of the Western Cape. The dried leaves have many medicinal uses due to its antiseptic and diuretic properties.

Pelargonium luridum (Ishaqa)
The plant is a herbaceous perennial with a tuberous rootstock from rosettes of divided leaves and pink, white or greenish-yellow flowers on tall stalks emerges. Ishaqa is distributed over large parts of Southern Africa’s interior. The tuberous, fleshy rootstock has many medicinal uses of which analgesic effects and for treating bronchitis.

Cyclopia intermedia (Honeybush tea)

The multi-branched, woody shrub of 1m high has golden coloured young twigs clothed in leaves, comprising of three leaflets. Flat, brown seed pods appear after the flowering period of yellow blooms. It is distributed in the southern and eastern parts of the Cape. Leaves, twigs and flowers are used in liquid form to treat weak digestion amongst others.

Moth Parcel:

Place these little bundles in your linen cupboard to repel moths. Refill once a year.
To make the moth bag you will need…
One square piece of fabric.
Piece of ribbon.
Mix 1 parts each of mint, rosemary, southernwood, thyme and tansy (all chopped) with ½ part of dried and ground lemon peel plus ground cloves. Scoop some of the mixture in the center of the square, meet up the corners and, using the ribbon, and tie them together.

Read all about aromatherapy...

GENERAL WARNING
This website contains general information about medicinal plants and their uses. It is intended as a general overview and not as a medical handbook for self-treatment. Many of the medicinal plants described are highly toxic and may cause severe allergic reactions or serious poisoning. We cannot be held responsible for claims arising from the mistaken identity of plants or their inappropriate use. Do not attempt self-diagnosis or self-treatment. Always consult a medical professional or qualified practitioner.


Articles

Winter Salads For Health and Energy / Herbal Remedies For Coughs and Colds

Bookmark the permalink.